Candidate sees Common Core in current state ed standards

Letter To the Editor

Last week the Tribune published an article from Jacob Orledge related to my candidacy for Ray School Board. In it, he incorrectly stated that North Dakota no longer uses Common Core State Standards and has written its own educational standards.

This is simply not true.

By making this statement, Mr. Orledge made it appear that I did not know what I was talking about in relation to the standards. Whether this was intentional or not, I do not know, but I want to set the record straight.

A simple comparison of our “ND State Standards” to the National Common Core Standards reveals that these two sets of standards are virtually the same. I encourage anyone interested to make the comparison and see for themselves.

National Common Core Standards Vs. “North Dakota State Standards”

National Common Core Standards

CCSS.Math.Content.5.NF.B.5

Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), by: Explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction greater than 1 results in a product greater than the given number (recognizing multiplication by whole numbers greater than 1 as a familiar case); explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction less than 1 results in a product smaller than the given number; and relating the principle of fraction equivalence a/b = (n × a)/(n × b) to the effect of multiplying a/b by 1.

North Dakota Standards 5.NF.5

Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), by: a. Comparing the size of a product to the size of one factor on the basis of the size of the other factor, without performing the indicated multiplication. b. Explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction greater than 1 Example: results in a product greater than the given number (recognizing multiplication by whole numbers greater than 1 as a familiar case)

Explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction less than 1 results in a product smaller than the given number. c. Relating the principle of fraction equivalence a/b = (n×a) / (n×b) to the effect of multiplying a/b by 1.

In the future, I would encourage our local journalists to provide statements that they have personally researched, in order to avoid misinforming the public. I also encourage parents, as well as all citizens, to carefully review and research what curricula and standards are being utilized in our local schools.

Links:

“ND State Standards”
www.nd.gov/dpi/sites/www/files/documents/Academic%20Support/v3.Mathematics%20Standards%20Final%208.14.17.pdf

National Common Core Standards

Number & Operations—Fractions

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