Latest News

Ray finishes up summer construction projects

 

Posted 10/20/15 (Tue)

Ray finishes up summer construction projects

By Traci Papineau
As the building season winds down, infrastructure improvement projects in Ray are finishing up.
At the commission meeting earlier this month, the city engineers updated the commission on the status of the projects.
The Fourth Street project, which consisted of tearing out the road and replacing water and sewer, is on the home stretch.  
Originally, the contractor planned to lay down gravel and finish up paving the road next spring, but it appears the paving will happen before winter.  
Sidewalks, curbs, and gutters were poured last week, and the paving is expected to start this week. 
The commission also debated the most cost-effective options to replace a water line that runs along the railroad in the southwest area of town.  
The cheapest way to do it is to get an easement across some private property, but that would put the pipe within ten feet of a home.
“There is no good way to handle it,” said Commissioner Richard Liesener. “As a property owner, I wouldn’t want it that close to my house.”
The commission decided it would be best to spend the extra money to keep it in the city’s right of way.
“For an additional 20-some thousand dollars, let’s do it properly,” Commissioner Troy Kupper said. 
The commission also discussed future projects. 
Mark Cahoon, who has worked for years to build on property he owns on Ray’s Main Street, presented a plan for new commercial development down town. He wanted to know if the commission has a preference in renters now that he has a building plan that has been approved for the site.  
Cahoon said he has two restaurant owners interested in renting from him, but he requested input from the commissioners on who they would be most comfortable renting at the location, should the structure be built. 
Commissioners said they want to see the building go up but gave no specific preferences on renters.
They told Cahoon he needs to get the building permit reinstated and have the leasing company submit a plan for the front of the building. 
“It needs to be aesthetically pleasing and not just a tin front,” stressed Mayor Ken Munson.