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Ray counselor part of network of mental health services

 

Posted 11/15/16 (Tue)

Ray counselor part of network of mental health services

By Kevin Killough
Terry Goldade is a licensed independent clinical social worker providing services part-time at the Northland Health Center in Ray.
In an area with a shortage of mental health professionals, it is a fortunate partnership between Northland and Goldade for the community. 
“It just worked out,” he said. 
Northland
The Ray clinic is one of many mental health providers in the region, and they form a network of partners that addresses the needs of the community. 
These partners refer patients to one another when a particular person with a particular need can be better served by another provider. 
In an area of limited resources spread out over a large distance, the informal system helps meet the demand. 
Goldade said referrals are not just from other providers, but also from schools, hospitals, and health clinics. 
At the Northland clinic, Goldade provides what he calls “traditional counseling” mostly to people who live around the Ray area.  
He said he doesn’t provide play therapy for young children and mostly provides services to adults and children 10-years-old and up. 
His clients typically don’t have severe or co-existing disorders, such as a person with substance abuse issues and schizophrenia. 
Emergent and high-risk patients are better served by facilities such as the Northwest Human Service Center in Williston. 
Not a stranger
Goldade has over 30 years in mental health services.
He is from Minot and moved to Williston in 1989. 
His wife, Valerie, is from Powers Lake. 
He’s one of a small group of people from the area who get professional degrees in the field of mental health and then decide to return. 
“I’m not a stranger to the area,” he said.
He and his wife have six kids, and he said it’s a good place to raise children. 
He began his career at Eckert Youth Homes, where he worked for 15 years, eventually becoming director. 
After attempting to establish a ministry with his wife, which didn’t pan out, the couple founded Dakota Family Solutions in Williston.
Goldade is director of the non-profit, and his wife, Valerie, is the assistant director.
“To be honest, my wife does most of the work,” Goldade said. 
This left him with the time to pursue the position in Ray.
Range of services
The organization provides a range of services that are both “positive and preventative in nature.” 
They have a teen mothers group, an autism support group for parents of autistic children, and an infertility support group. 
Goldade said the areas of service they provide were largely developed in response to areas where people just weren’t finding the services they needed.
Parents of autistic children were having such a hard time finding services, they were about to give up.
“You had some people ready to just move away,” he said. 
His wife holds the class for teen parents, and he said it’s very effective at giving them the tools they need to raise their children. 
“We have some of the moms who stay in the program as they get older.” 
And Goldade said the help they provide the community is coming back to them. 
“We’re very community-oriented, and the community has been really supportive.”