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Grain Palace Days goes on despite construction

 

Posted 8/11/15 (Tue)

Grain Palace Days goes on despite construction

By Kevin Killough
Ray was determined to hold the Grain Palace Days, complete with the annual car show, despite widespread construction throughout the town. 
Construction stopped the show in 2013, but this year the town still made it happen.
Mayor Ken Munson praised the efforts of the projects’ contractors and Ray’s Public Works Director Jim Dickey. This included getting the paving complete on Main Street and Score Street in time for the celebration, as well as installing a new sign at the Ray Mall. 
“They busted their butts to get this done. Everything went really well,” Munson said. 
Dickey downplayed his own role in making it happen and attributed it more to the contractors’ planning.
“I just kind of kept everything going,” Dickey said. 
The event served as a rallying point for two reunions, the Ray classes of 1985 and 1970. 
“Things have changed a little, but a lot of things have improved,” said Ed Ennis, who came out from Williston for the 1970 class reunion. 
Rudy Miller returned from Georgia to participate with his former classmates. 
“Every 20 years, I try to come back,” he said. 
The group made a float for the parade out of one of the car show entrants, a 1928 IHC 6-speed 1-ton pickup. 
Mark Weyrauch said he got the vehicle from his grandfather and has been restoring it since 1984.
“We had it on the farm all the time,” Weyrauch said. 
The car show drew more than a dozen entrants, with everything from modern sports cars, tractors, and classic cars. 
Sam Sagasar Jr., from Williston, entered his 1957 Chevrolet Nomad. He purchased the car back in the late 1990s after he spotted it for sale while leaving a fireworks show in Wildrose. 
“We had it in the family for quite a while,” Sagasar Jr. said. 
His father also entered a 1957 Chrysler New Yorker, which he bought off the Internet from a seller in Texas. Today the car is a collector’s item, but when it was first built, it was a luxury vehicle for the well-off. 
“This was a doctor’s car, a lawyer’s car -- big, expensive cars back then,” Sagasar said. 
Orris Herland came down from Corinth to show off his 1927 HIP truck. Herland arrived too late to compete, but when he pulled into the show, people gathered around to see the unusual pickup.
The truck was built by an aircraft manufacturer who had retooled its California factory after the end of World War I. So rare is the vehicle that Herland had trouble transferring its 1943 title when he first got the truck because the state couldn’t figure out the point of origin. 
Niel Olson, whose 1959 Chevy Impala won the Pioneer Award in the show, is a regular appearance at the Ray car show. He has a room in his house full of trophies for various car shows he’s participated in from around the country.
“I’ve been going to car shows for over 30 years,” Olson said.