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Streets added, taken out of Crosby street project

Posted 6/21/16 (Tue)

Streets added, taken out of Crosby street project

By Carrie Sandstrom
Crosby’s citywide street reconstruction will now also include Main Street NW and Main Street NE by the courthouse, following a special meeting held by the Crosby City Council on Thursday to discuss possible changes to the project.
Divide County has agreed to contribute around $40,000 to the work on the added portions of Main Street, although Crosby Mayor Bert Anderson said the city will accept more money if offered.
With the county’s contribution, the added portions of Main Street will cost the city approximately $65,000.
The city council also voted to install a drain tile, which removes excess water from the soil subsurface, on the east end of Ninth Avenue, following Mayo Construction’s suggestion to do so at a progress meeting on June 9. The drain tile will help to combat the area’s high water table and should increase the longevity of the new roads. Adding the drain tile will cost approximately $23,500.
In addition to the added portions of the project, the council   also voted to pay for additional cement treatment on the alleys around Main Street and Fourth Avenue. This decision comes after Mayo Construction project manager Bill Werven raised concerns about running low on materials to rebuild streets. 
According to Werven, material that is ground off the roads is then reused to build the streets back up and provide a gravel base. However, as the project has progressed more material has been used than has been ground, leaving about a 1,500 ton material deficit. Additional cement treatment will allow workers to use less material to rebuild roads and hopefully prevent the need to purchase additional material. Additional cement treatment will cost approximately $11,000.
In order to make up some of the money being spent, the council voted to eliminate Second Avenue SW, which runs in front of the new BNC bank location, a portion that was added onto the project earlier this summer. In addition to saving money, the decision also reflects the uncertainty as to what the bank will be doing on its end for construction. 
Anderson said it doesn’t make any sense to spend money on the road if the work would just have to be torn up later in the summer as construction on the bank gets under way. Engineering firm AE2S estimates that removing Second Avenue SW will save the city $116,000.