Latest News

Crosby looks at chip and seal in 2017

Posted 10/11/16 (Tue)

Crosby looks at chip and seal in 2017

By Cecile Wehrman
The rest of Crosby’s streets may be spruced up ahead of a city-wide celebration planned for next summer.
The Crosby City Council last week asked its engineer to begin assessing the number of blocks on which a chip and seal program could be undertaken early in the 2017 construction season.
“We would just as soon not have that done during the celebration,” said Mayor Bert Anderson.
At the same time, said Anderson, “I would like to do all of it and be done with it.”
Following a discussion on the merits of micro-surfacing streets instead of chip sealing, council members called for the development of an assessment of how many blocks need attention.
“A lot of the streets haven’t been touched for a while,” said Engineer Bill Moonen.
“It’s been 10 years,” said Anderson, with the last of the special assessments on Crosby’s last major paving operation, paid off last year.
Anderson said he believes there could be about 120 blocks in town. Fifty-three blocks had new pavement laid in 2016. The project was paid for with state “surge” funds, for oil impacted cities and counties.
Moonen said the evaluation of other blocks can be done this fall.
Councilman Troy Vassen asked about patching city employees were going to do prior to chip sealing.
Councilman Steve Dhuyvetter made a motion to get costs for both chip sealing and patch work, to see if it makes sense to have a contractor do all of the work.
Budget passed
The council passed a budget for next year calling for a local levy of just $44,500.
“The amount we need from the sheriff’s department will actually be going down,” said Anderson.
Earlier in the meeting, Sheriff Lauren Throntveit presented a policing budget $120,000 less than last year, due to the reduction in labor and jail costs. At the same time, the city’s share of oil and gas production taxes remains healthy -- averaging about $58,000 per month.
Then again, said Anderson, it fluctuates. Last month, the city received $224,000 from oil income.
“The bottom line is we are living off oil and gas production tax,” so the portion of city operations paid by taxpayers is very low.
“The total amount we’re levying -- that wouldn’t pay for a fourth or a fifth of police protection,” said Anderson.
In other business, the council:
Called for the development of a letter to go to the Department of Transportation on the city’s dissatisfaction with the new layout of the highway  entry across from New Century Ag Truck Stop.