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Ag Week brings tractors to school, attention to mission

Posted 3/01/16 (Tue)

Ag Week brings tractors to school, attention to mission

By Cecile Krimm
Why drive a tractor to school?
Well, just to say you did.
That’s what Preston Krecklau, Rider Jacobson, Colton Molloy and Ty Sparks did on Wednesday last week, as part of the Divide County High School FFA Chapter’s observance of FFA Week.
Preston drove his dad, Jamison’s, 9400 4WD John Deere from the family farm, about 10 miles east of Crosby.
While his dad may have been more comfortable with his son taking a smaller model, Preston wanted to drive the rig just “cuz it’s so big.”
Ryder traveled about five miles in a 7220 John Deere loader, from his folks’ place east of Crosby. Ryder’s mom, Shelbey Jacobson, is the FFA Advisor.
Ty took off from his grandparents’ place -- the Dale and Karen Sparks farm -- about 15 miles southwest of town on Tuesday  night, then drove about a mile from his folks’ house in a Case Quad 440, in the morning.
Colton got permission to bring Art Glasoe’s antique McCormick in from the threshing grounds.
“We got to New Century Ag at 7 a.m. and had a cup of coffee while waiting for everyone to get there,” said Preston, “then drove to school.”
All except Molloy, that is. A dirty carburetor gave some trouble and his dad finally had to pull the old tractor to the high school lot.
Other activities
“Drive Your Tractor to School” day was just one of the activities in the week-long observance.
While the activity has been held at various times in the past, including during Ag Day last year, the weather cooperated to allow it to be held during Ag Week this year.
“‘Drive Your Tractor’ was one of those they wanted to do again,” said Cody Roland, interim Vo-Ag teacher.
With the weather so nice this year, some more traditional Ag Week activities, such as toboggan races, were not possible.
Instead committee members established Monday as Blue & Gold Day and held a pie eating contest. Tuesday gave students a license to wear hats to class and the Ag Olympics. Thursday was wear camouflage day and Friday was work out day.
Students Madison Vigness and Keely Poole, neither of whom come from farm families, helped put the schedule together.
Both sophomore girls remember when they were visited at the elementary school by FFA members and had homemade ice cream.
“It was fun,” said Keely.
Now the girls see a different purpose for those visits but they still want younger children to gain knowledge in a way that is enjoyable.
“It’s just to let them know agriculture is important to our community,” said Madison, and “let them see what they can experience in high school” added Keely.
“FFA isn’t really just about farms,” said Madison. “You can learn about animals and all sorts of stuff.”
“Everything around you is agriculture so coming from a small town, I think it’s nice to learn about agriculture,” said Keely.
FFA Members visited elementary classes last week with activities to encourage reading about agriculture. Some elementary students also received FFA pens and notebooks as part of the observance.