Crosby is undergoing a true transformation this summer

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Posted 6/07/16 (Tue)

Whines & Roses
By Cecile Wehrman

Talk about a building year!
Everywhere you look in Crosby, contractors are at work -- on our streets, at the courthouse, on the new daycare center and even removing a major structure on our  Main Street.
Frankly, it’s a mess! But what a great mess to have.
It is so fitting that all of this work is taking place the summer before what I hope will be a chance for lots of folks to come home to Crosby and see the city transformed.
You haven’t heard much lately about Crosby’s 2017 Celebration, but it’s time for our committee to start getting down to some more definite planning.
One theme I have thought of -- “Building on the past, preparing for the future,” or something along those lines. Because that’s really what the celebration is all about.
Ninety-nine years ago, in 1917, Crosby saw a similar flurry of activity in building the community we have today. That was the year the Divide County Courthouse was constructed, the Citizen’s Bank building (now Crosby Flats), the Ingwalson Building (now Divide-Burke Abstract) and the original hospital building, to name just a few.
Back then, the streets were gravel -- and when you look at it that way, the hard tack surface we are currently driving on doesn’t seem quite so bad. Sure, it has been a challenge to get from one end of town to another as every day, it seems another route is closed off.
The only criticism I have heard so far is that, aside from having “Road Closed” signs at the locations where work is in progress, it would be nice for any visitors if the sign also pointed the way to an alternate route to our downtown.
It can’t be much of a surprise to anyone that our Main Street is already seeing a decline in traffic. It’s hard to tell whether it’s just the fact school is out, the oil industry is slower or if it is actually the road construction.
As the project moves north, it’s going to be extremely important that everyone has the information they need to navigate and to continue to conduct business. The city council has repeatedly promised they will do everything to help businesses make it work and in general, the contractors have been very communicative.
For sure, you can’t have change without a few growing pains. This summer is bound to bring plenty of frustration as more and more blocks are torn up, but just look at what we stand to gain!
Next summer we truly will have a town worth celebrating!